Share Project

Sharing & representing teaching practice

Credits

The Share Project is funded from the UK NTFS Project Strand

CSS based on a template from Andreas Viklund

"Two faces" image based on an original photograph by Dave Wood and used with permission

Project Partners

The Share Project was led by Sally Fincher from the University of Kent.
Project partner: Janet Finlay (then of) Leeds Metropolitan University.
Consultants: Isobel Falconer, (then of) Glasgow Caledonian University; Helen Sharp, Open University & Josh Tenenberg, University of Washington, Tacoma.

Materials

See the Publications pages for project materials.

Here is the original bid

Attribution

Except where otherwise noted, content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Licence

Creative Commons License

The Share Project was funded in the NTFS "Project Strand" from 2008-2012. This site is primarily historical and only sporadically updated.

Sharing Practice

How do educators discover “what works ”?

How do they find out what other teachers do successfully? And how do they adapt it for their own circumstances?

A Disciplinary Commons brings together educators from different institutions who are teaching the same course (Human-Computer Interaction, perhaps, or Introduction to Shakespeare).

We shall run three Commons in each of the next three years. A Commons seeks to provide community for teachers, and develop an appropriate documentation for teaching practice.

Representing Practice

What is an appropriate representation of teaching practice?

We shall create and evaluate different representations of practice from rich, complex documents such as course portfolios, through to more abstracted and sparse forms such as guidelines and patterns

Adopting Practice

How does educators’ practice change over time?

We shall undertake a small-scale, longitudinal study to map change, paying especial regard to how educators seek, evaluate and incorporate new practices.

For one year, we’re going to undertake a “day survey” of teaching activities, asking educators to keep a diary of their teaching on a given day every month. Inspired by Mass Observation we hope this extensive collection will add contrast to the more intense data from the longitudinal study.